7 Great Films Written By Women

Women! We love women. We especially love women behind the camera. Ladies telling stories, promoting their talents, bringing stories to the big screen. There is nothing better than a woman screenwriter.

So  we’re taking a look at some fantastic films written by female screenwriters.

Sense and Sensibility (1995) – Emma Thompson

Image result for Sense and Sensibility emma thompson

We may know Thompson as an incredible actress, but she is also an Academy Award winning screenwriter.  Her adaptation of Jane Austen’s terrific drama, revolving around betrothed sisters, and secret loves, is considered one of the best period dramas of all time, reinforcing Austen’s elements of feminist satire Directed by Ang Lee, Thompson too stars as the beloved Elinor and with a young Kate Winslet blossoming to a steadfast actress, Sense and Sensibility is a terrific, enjoyable, and deep movie helped by Thompson’s flare for writing.

Persepolis (2013) – Marjane Satrapi

Related image

Recently directing black comedy Ryan Reynolds led film The Voices, Satrapi’s best known work is for the adult animation Persepolis, based on her autobiographical novel of the same name. Co-written and co-directed  with Vincent Paronnaud ,the film revolves around a young girl coming of age during the Iranian Revolution. Winning the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, the movie is both an exhilarating and thrilling yet harrowing and anguish filled, a triumphant movie.

The Limehouse Golem (2017) – Jane Goldman

Image result for jane goldman the limehouse golem

Though Jane Goldman’s work consists off Kick-Ass, Stardust, and Kingsman, I have a soft spot for the recently released Victorian murder romp. Yes, there may be detractors to the movie, but the extremely entertaining flick sees Bill Nighy tackle the murky Victorian underground as a killer goes on the romp and a woman is set to hang for her murder of her husband. Full of twists and turns, this is a highly beguiling movie enriched with amusement and that cliched but still ridiculously enjoyable.  Goldman has a flare for the Victorian  macabre.

Gone Girl (2015) – Gillian Flynn

Image result for Gone Girl Gillian Flynn film

Adapted from her own novel, Flynn proved that she had might for the big screen (and should probably do some more work for cinema) with this Academy Award nominated script. The intense mystery thriller that led to one of the greatest performance of the year by the outstanding Rosamund Pike is an insatiable and lurid film with so much darkness. The murky elements of the film, matched with the twisting mystery made it David Fincher’s finer pieces and that’s all thanks to Flynn’s script. Even with knowing the book, she revisited Amy Dunne on a big screen with such a fresh beat that even die-hard fans would be impressed.

Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)  – Caroline Thompson

Image result for caroline thompson screenwriter

Did you know Nightmare Before Christmas was written by a woman? Did you? Because I didn’t and I am currently drinking tea from a Jack Skellington mug. I know, this is heinously amiss of me. It is the ultimate festive film revolving around the King of Halloween Town who becomes bored of his life and wishes to steal Christmas to bring some excitement back. This stop–motion epic, directed by Henry Selick and based on characters by Tim Burton, Thompson delights with this hilarious, witty, and at times deeply dark film filled to the brim with holiday cheer.

Juno (2010) – Diablo Cody

Image result for diablo cody jun oscar

Winning the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, Cody’s terrific and poignant depiction of a teen pregnancy was celebrated across the filled. This is even more amazing considering it was Cody’s debut screenplay. Launching Ellen Paige into the stratosphere, Juno was a humorous depiction of a teenager in a crisis with whip-smart dialogue and endearing, emotional moments within the comedy……home-skillet.

Singin In The Rain  (1952) – Betty Comden

Image result for Betty Comden Singin In The Rain

One of the most incredible and seminal musicals of all time, Singin In The Rain is an enchanting and thrilling piece directed by and starring Gene Kelly. It revolves around two men and a woman trying to make it in showbiz. Featuring some brilliant songs including the titular one and Good Morning, this is a must-see masterpiece. And it was crafted by a woman. Alongside Adolph Green, Betty Comden excelled in producing one of the most memorable and watchable musicals of all time. Part of a performance duo with Green, her work on the stage was essential to bringing Singin In The Rain to life!


What are your favourite films written by women? 

Everybody Knows (Todos lo Saben) – Review

by Coralie Bizien

Everybody Knows (Todos lo Saben) starts with the metronome sound of a clock mechanism. The introduction send us into the heart of a church bell tower, between darkness and sunlight, while a bird is trapped in a space where it cannot find this way out….

Image result for every body knows review

Laura (Penélope Cruz) returns in Spain with her two children, for the wedding of one of her sisters. She meets Paco (Javier Bardem), ex-lover and the buyer of the part of the family property that Laura had inherited. When her daughter goes missing during the wedding reception, the family is plunged into chaos. Under the eyes of the villagers, the troubles of the past and many resentments reappear…

We meet Laura as an energetic mother, happy attending the reunion of her family. Sweet dialogue exchanges establish the characters and their relationships, allowing us to discover them at the same time. The happiness of the reunion is soon met by with many different struggles such as a ign of financial worries, heartache, and common problems we all meet in life. But the reunion is also an opportunity for Laura’s daughter, Irene (Carla Campra) to meet Felipe (Sergio Castellanos) : a youthful love which, in the shadow of the conjugal celebrations, echoes the love that Laura and Paco once had for each other at their age.

The scenes follow one another and respond to one another, dominated by the ardor that takes precedence over reason until drama and suspicion are imposed. Asghar Farhadi admits the human mechanics even before really sketching the contours.

The audience play the role of a discreet observer who suddenly examines, the masks that shape what is happening in a front of us. Asghar Farhadi captures the silences, the sustained or fleeting glances, like the flighty speeches that dictate the rumour. Their masks fall off and reveal some shenanigans whose interest is, as the title underlines, of little importance.

With the naturalism of his approach and this cast, Asghar Farhadi takes us as far as his camera plunges us into a novel. The complexity of his writing is total; Does he set up a thriller, inviting us to look beyond the acts, facing the souls of these seeming archetypes? The answer of that question came directly from the screen which becomes a mirror where our own reflection is drawn….

The Iranian director doesn’t leave his obsession for human interaction behind. Todos lo saben serves as a manifesto: Farhadi is obsessed with human mechanics, what moves them, what ignites them, and their contradictory movements.

Image result for every body knows review

The structure is well recognised – reminiscent of About Elly (a weekend with friends turns to the criminal investigation coupled with the unveiling of buried intimate secrets) – the film that made Farhadi internationally renowned. Characters who seemed uninteresting are fascinating under the effect of unexpected. In Spanish vineyards, money reigns. We need it for the ransom, we need it to atone for past mistakes. He is the one who gradually undoes Laura’s solar insurance with Paco’s beautiful male chauvinist, and exercises that their performers (Cruz and Bardem) master perfectly.

With Todos lo saben, the Iranian director does not hesitate to highlight themes such as temporality and the importance of the past, mixing with the codes of a thriller as well as snippets of a great striking human comedy. Farhadi is not at his best, a little too academic, a little too “great cinema”, but it remains a very pleasant, tense and highly recommendable film.


Everybody Knows (Todos lo Saben) is out 8th March