You Are Not My Mother – Toronto International Film Festival 2021 Review

by Jordan KingIrish writer-director Kate Dolan’s You Are Not My Mother, a Samhain chiller nestled within the framework of a sympathetically crafted story about mothers, daughters, and the monstrousness of mental illness’ ravaging effect on both the afflicted and their loved ones was one of TIFF 2021’s most surprising standouts. Dolan’s film begins with a portentous wide shot of a baby’s pram beneath the lamplight … Continue reading You Are Not My Mother – Toronto International Film Festival 2021 Review

The Survivor – Toronto International Film Festival 2021 Review

by Jordan King Approximately six million Jewish people lost their lives at the hands of the Nazis during the atrocities of the Holocaust in World War Two. 965,000 of these deaths occurred at Auschwitz, Poland, and of those 965,000 Jewish people killed, 865,000 were sent to the gas chambers on arrival. That leaves 100,000 Jewish people whose deaths came in some cases days after their … Continue reading The Survivor – Toronto International Film Festival 2021 Review

Sundown – BFI London Film Festival Review

by Jordan King A quietly menacing malaise laps against the shores of Acapulco, resting at the feet of the Bennett family in Sundown, a sun-kissed and unsettlingly serene anti-thriller from Mexican provoc-auteur Michel Franco. Franco’s film opens with the Bennetts – Neil (Tim Roth), sister Alice (Charlotte Gainsbourg), and her two teenage kids – enjoying life in the lap of luxury at a hotel resort … Continue reading Sundown – BFI London Film Festival Review

The Guilty – Review

by Jordan King When Danish filmmaker Gustav Möller’s The Guilty came out in 2018, Jake Gyllenhaal was quick to swoop the rights to an American remake for his production company ‘Nine Stories’. A taut, tense thriller evocative in formal restriction of the Dogme ‘95 movement supported by the likes of European art-house auteurs like Lars Von Trier, The Guilty took the basic concept of a … Continue reading The Guilty – Review

Scare Me – Review

by Jordan King Josh Ruben’s Scare Me, the multi-hyphenate CollegeHumor alum’s feature directorial debut, is an absolute doozy of a genre-reflexive slice of fried comical, creepy gold. Through the bare minimum of set, cast, and spectacle, Ruben successfully takes the idea of telling spooky tales back to its roots in the oral fireside folktale tradition, placing imagination over explicit shock and awe tactics to devilishly … Continue reading Scare Me – Review